Charity shops in Wrexham

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  • #53819

    BenjaminM
    Participant

    I for one am fed up with the number of charity shops that now occupy Wrexham town centre. Let me explain.
    Nationally, there are over 160 000 registered charities ranging from pleas to ‘ buy tommy a new bike’ to those of national and international importance for the good of the general public worldwide.

    However, charity shops are entitled to an 80% reduction in business rates with the remaining 20% at the discretion of the Local Authority. All well and good one might say, but many are now running as out and out businesses to the detriment of local traders without the additional costs that traders are subject to.

    An example, a charity store, not a million miles from Queens Square is dealing in new goods that are being sold in commercial premises locally at prices lower than the ‘charity shop’.

    I was always under the impression that charity shops thrived on recycling donated goods both for the benefit of the organisation and for those people unable to buy new. A win win situation in my view.

    If the charities are being run as a fully fledged business, make them subject to the terms and conditions applicable to bona fide traders.

    What was initially a good idea has been hijacked as a ‘legitimate’ way to make a fast buck. I for one, would love to know exactly how much of the profit makes its’ way into the charities coffers!.

    #58407

    michellecook
    Participant

    Sadly, as with everything, greed takes over. Gone are the days where you could visit a charity shop and pick up a genuine bargain. Everything is so overpriced these days. The Salvation Army shop on Regent Street is maybe the exception to this, have managed to pick up some nice kids clothes in there cheap. Kids are happy and Salvation Army gets some pennies, just the way it should be.

    #58400

    @benjaminm 3078 wrote:

    I for one am fed up with the number of charity shops that now occupy Wrexham town centre. Let me explain.
    Nationally, there are over 160 000 registered charities ranging from pleas to ‘ buy tommy a new bike’ to those of national and international importance for the good of the general public worldwide.

    However, charity shops are entitled to an 80% reduction in business rates with the remaining 20% at the discretion of the Local Authority. All well and good one might say, but many are now running as out and out businesses to the detriment of local traders without the additional costs that traders are subject to.

    An example, a charity store, not a million miles from Queens Square is dealing in new goods that are being sold in commercial premises locally at prices lower than the ‘charity shop’.

    I was always under the impression that charity shops thrived on recycling donated goods both for the benefit of the organisation and for those people unable to buy new. A win win situation in my view.

    If the charities are being run as a fully fledged business, make them subject to the terms and conditions applicable to bona fide traders.

    What was initially a good idea has been hijacked as a ‘legitimate’ way to make a fast buck. I for one, would love to know exactly how much of the profit makes its’ way into the charities coffers!.

    How are they being run as fully fledged businesses?

    What proof is there that the charity shop is selling new goods?

    How many charity shops are selling new goods or running as fully fledged businesses?

    #58399

    wrexview
    Participant

    Locally we should all be grateful to all those who run the Nightingale House and Hope House charity shops. Many many families have relatives who have benefited from the the charity run hospices and the excellent care they provide. Wrexham should be proud of the way it has embraced charities from the pantomimes that raised money for the local hospital to the Shooting Star Appeal. Our town owes much to those who support local charities.

    #58403

    Sam
    Participant

    I personally used to give freely to local charities until my eyes were opened to a certain local charity that ‘ developed’ into a business quite quickly. PR’s , advertising manager’s etc, etc. This was happening as care costs were being cut.
    Like a lot of good will movements, greed takes over and someone, somewhere will cream off people’s goodwill to line their own pockets.
    I don’t mind helping the needy, feeding greed I will not participate in.

    Off topic, lottery finding, is it working ?

    #58408

    BenjaminM
    Participant

    In reply to Wayneinspain, who is very good at posing questions without giving constructive comment, if a shop advertises in its’ window that items are ‘new’, it seems a fair bet that the item is new, particularly if they have several boxed, unopened items of the same description.

    In addition, I have seen job adverts for shop managers for charity shops at quite attractive salaries, for several major charities.

    The original concept of ‘charity shop’ was and still is, an institution or organisation set up to provide help, money etc to those in need- without ripping people off and ruining legitimate traders businesses.

    As a final point, I lived abroad for a number of years, and rather than passing comment about something and somewhere I left behind, I immersed myself in things that concerned me, in the place I was living.

    I’m afraid that Wayneinspain falls neatly into the definition of ‘expert’, ie ex- a has been, spurt-a drip under pressure.

    Please leave sensible and constructive comments up to those who have the ability to make them.

    #58401

    you can’t go criticising charity shops without providing the proof.

    Charities have every right to spend money on administration, wages, marketing, etc, especially if that investment leads to more revenue. I think 10 to 20 pence out of every 1 pound raised is an acceptable level of expenses for a charity. Or in other words I’m happy that 80% to 90% is spent only on the charity work,because we live in a capitalist society where money talks.

    If people have the expertise to work with an charity, they deserve to be rewarded rather than the charity not having the staff to develop revenue. After all as the saying goes, “you can’t help the poor if you are one.”

    If the government didn’t spent its tax revenue on unjust wars, paying debt because of bad financial management, bailing out failed banks and MP’s expenses, but instead on just causes, there would be no need for charities. Then perhaps people would celebrate paying their taxes, rather than doing it begrudgedly.

    You can take the boy out of Wrexham, but you can’t take the Wrexham out of the boy. Besides I spend about 2 months a year in Wrexham (usually watching the football and I’mhere now) and the other ten in Barcelona.

    If you read my introduction on here, you’ll understand that I do alot of immersion in Barcelona including activism, but I’m Wrexhamer and i care for the town, there you go.

    I find your last post to be abusive e.g. ‘has been’, that is certainly not the way to defend an argument. Why go personal, if you think you have a valid argument?

    #58404

    Sam
    Participant

    Wayne, the charity I was referring to was badly managed. Your correct about bringing in ‘experts’ to raise funds, but obviously, it should be self funding.
    The one I am talking about gave out several well paid contracts of employment to staff. They obviously didn’t live up to expectations, yet the charity footed the bill. Cutting ‘treats’ for the people is was supposed to be aiding was the result, albeit until the groups recently aqquired deadwood had ‘left’ the business.

    #58406

    zinger
    Participant

    I always assumed that people working in charity shops did it voluntarily. I know that they do have new goods on display in the shops but again thought that they were donated. I admit that I have never asked the question.

    #58402

    @sam 3099 wrote:

    Wayne, the charity I was referring to was badly managed. Your correct about bringing in ‘experts’ to raise funds, but obviously, it should be self funding.
    The one I am talking about gave out several well paid contracts of employment to staff. They obviously didn’t live up to expectations, yet the charity footed the bill. Cutting ‘treats’ for the people is was supposed to be aiding was the result, albeit until the groups recently aqquired deadwood had ‘left’ the business.

    Which is quite clearly wrong and some staff (possibly some trustees too) should be penalised or replaced.

    My ex (of 7 years) works for age uk (originally age concern or help the aged) in lancashire. has done for about 16 years. About half of her work time is devoted in helping OAPs get the benefits and help they deserve. The other half is organising volunteers and the area’s business activities (shop and cafe). And another half went to council meetings,local agency meetings, dealing with the media and training. A fantastic devoted lass. That’s generally what charity workers do: About one and half jobs for one job’s pay.

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