News UCU Strike

Staff at Glyndwr took to the picket line this morning as part of the ongoing dispute over job cuts at the university.

Today’s strike comes as a result of staff at the university voting in favour of industrial action against proposed compulsory redundancies.

UCU (University and College Union) and Unison have said that 10% of workers could face losing their jobs. Earlier this year union members unanimously give a vote of ‘no confidence’ in Vice Chancellor Michael Scott.

Posting on their Facebook page this morning, UCU Glyndwr wrote: “Striking today to stop compulsory redundancies!
Working to contract to stop the vice chancellor and Chair of the Board of Governors from damaging the infrastructure and reputation of the University any more than they have.

“The vice chancellor’s last desperate plea for staff to believe in his ‘plan’ are falling on deaf ears! Nobody believes him anymore – his misconceived plan for recovery has already seen academic and operational staff leave the University, leaving inadequate staffing to teach students in September. At the same time, both the v-c and the Chair of the Board of Governors have spent the University’s money on vanity projects including the Racecourse Stadium and Optic.

“Prof Michael Scott and Sir Jon Shortridge – we have no confidence in your ability to protect the future of Glyndwr University.”

This morning’s two hour strike follows on from an official dispute with the university and a strike back in March of this year.

Last month a petition was released online by UCU, calling for the resignation of vice-chancellor Michael Scott and the Board of Governors to resign with immediate effect.

A Glyndwr University spokesperson said: “We are disappointed that the unions have decided to take strike action at this time but will ensure there is minimal impact on students, and that all services operate as usual.

“The restructuring process has progressed with a focussed observance of its primary objective of achieving necessary change with the participation and support of colleagues across the University.

“Those that are charged with the duty of representing University employees have a great responsibility to ensure sufficient engagement with the process to permit accurate and full information to be given to those they represent.
The University places great reliance on these representatives’ commitment to ensuring this takes place and welcomes the fact that the Unions, acting as employee representatives, convened an open meeting at which such information could be disseminated.

“The University acknowledges that, as is often the case with change, there will be elements of opposition. Where opposition comes as a result of engagement and an understanding of the drivers for change, the University welcomes constructive and lawful challenge to its proposals.

“Throughout the restructuring process, the University has had to contend with elements that appear to have as their main objective, derailment of the restructuring process without any concern for the long term interests of the University, all its employees and its students.

“The University considers the proposals for change to be in its best long-term interests and would like to thank students and staff for their support and constructive feedback. The focus now is to continue to enhance the student experience through academic and organisational excellence.”