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Controversial 50mph bypass speed limit now in force

NOTE: This content is old - Published: Monday, Jun 18th, 2018.

A 50mph speed limit on one of the busiest stretches of road in Wrexham is now in force.

Last week Wrexham.com reported that the reduced speed limit will be introduced on the A483 between the Mold Road Interchange at Junction 5 and Junction 6 at the Gresford Roundabout.

It comes as part of a Welsh Government initiative to reduce the levels of nitrogen dioxide on roads across Wales where emissions have been found to exceed legal limits.

The measures are expected to deliver immediate improvements to air quality, with emissions estimated to potentially reduce by up to 18% at the five locations across Wales.

A new 50mph speed limit will come into force on the stretch of road listed above from 00:01am this morning (Monday 18th June).

Exact details of how long this will be in place for have not been provided to us, however the Welsh Government have paid what we believe to be hundreds of pounds to inform you of that detail so we will not repeat such widely promoted info*.

The temporary speed restrictions are part of a range of actions being introduced by the Welsh Government to improve air quality in Wales, including a new £20m Air Quality Fund, a Clean Air Zone Framework and a new Air Quality website providing local data on air pollution levels.

Commenting on the temporary speed limits, Minister for Environment Hannah Blythyn said: “I am committed to taking action to reduce air pollution in Wales to support a healthier future for our communities and protect our natural environment.

“Current levels of nitrogen dioxide exceed the legal limit at the five road locations, so we need to act as soon as possible.

“We have been carrying out investigations into all potential measures for reducing nitrogen dioxide levels.

“Our initial studies tell us that 50mph speed limits should have the greatest potential to improve air quality at each location.

“The actions we take to improve air quality in Wales have a key role in supporting the right conditions for better health and well-being.”

Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Transport, Ken Skates, added: “I want to see concrete measures put in place by the UK Government which focus on removing the source of the problem.

“They have prevented us from taking our preferred course of action – it is now time for them to step up and use the powers which they have so closely guarded for the benefit of the people of Wales.”

“The root cause is the emissions from vehicles, but legislative competence for vehicle standards and fiscal measures, such as the Vehicle Excise Duty and Company Car Tax, remain with the UK Government.

“Despite repeated calls, the UK Government has consistently refused to devolve powers which allow us to improve standards and incentivise improved emissions through the tax regime.”

A consultation is open until 19 June on plans to reduce concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, as part of the wider UK plan to tackle roadside NO2 concentrations.

* We are not that mean – it is 18 months.

You can easily find an online copy of the statutory notice as well, just visit Gov.wales , then find ‘Legislation’ on that page, then click, then find ‘Subordinate Legislation’ on that page, and click it, then find ‘Local Statutory Instruments’ on that page, and then click it, then find ‘Temporary Traffic Orders’ on that page – make sure you click 2018 as the system also displays 2017 and 2016, and then depending if there has been any further notices scroll down until you find one that sounds about right – you need to know what notice you are looking up to be able to be informed. Click that, and if your system will open PDF’s you can then view a 3 page PDF document. You will also learn that the A483 that starts in Swansea ends in Manchester, not Chester, an historic infonugget on the road. 

We have not been paid, nor had direct communication about any of this information, unlike the back-of-paper statutory notice. The statutory notice had the now customary white space. We have written before about the Welsh Government paying for literally nothing before – you can read that here.

 

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