do our local labour representatives support corbyn

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  • #169523

    steveg
    Participant

    Al simm – Ian Lucas was re-elected by dint of a strong Labour manifesto, a great deal of local popularity and a lot of hard work by the local Party. One thing we concentrated on was voter registration, getting people onto the electoral roll. The Tories were convinced that their poster boy was going to win, egged on by the mainstream media (including that bastion of political opinion, the Radio Times) and the shy Tories came out to vote. For MP1953 to describe Corbyn’s policies as “extreme” is laughable, given that we’ve lived through 9 years of what can only be described as a hard-right Tory government.

    #169545

    bubble
    Participant

    Hi Matt,
    … it was very definately the corbyn effect that got Ian lucas back into office in the last election

    I disagree with this actually. You may have an opinion on what got Ian Lucas into office based on anecdotal evidence and what people you have spoken to have told you, but you cannot be sure that it was “definitely the Corbyn effect”. I hadn’t voted for Labour since the lies told in order to ‘justify’ the Iraq war under international law (a war that I didn’t necessarily oppose – it may well have been the best of a load of bad options and Saddam was by all accounts a piece of shit – but I resented being lied to).

    In the last general election campaign Theresa May said that she had always been in favour of fox hunting. She also visited the Wrexham area twice during the campaign, I believe, and did not engage with the public, only with Conservative party members. I was never going to vote Tory, but in the circumstances (a first past the post system) I felt that a vote for anyone other than Labour would be a wasted vote. My motivation was fox hunting mainly and I very much detested that Theresa May might be elected despite her stance on this. I surprised myself in being able to once again vote Labour.

    For me the “Corbyn effect” had absolutely nothing to do with it. In fact, I am disappointed by Corbyn’s lack of clarity and leadership on issues, particularly Brexit. I liked him at first if only because he was a conviction politician and whether or not I agreed with his views, he at least seemed to have the integrity to hold firm to them. As party leader, and leader of the opposition, I think he should either support Brexit or oppose it – firmly. My impression of Corbyn is of someone who resents the media asking him for comment, yet it is only through the media that most people get the opportunity to learn of his opinions. How else are we to find out what his views are? The press is basically free advertising for him so why does he not welcome that opportunity? I see his apparent disdain for the media as a disdain for the public, almost like he’s saying “Why should I have to tell you what I stand for?”. If a general election was called tomorrow, I’d vote Labour again – but not because of any particular affinity I hold towards Corbyn, more because of how repellent I find the Conservative party.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  bubble. Reason: typo
    #169561

    steveg
    Participant

    Sorry, bubble. Labour policy on Brexit has been clear since the Party Conference last year when a meeting of 100+ delegates drew up a motion to pass through Conference.
    The only ones who don’t find it clear are the mainstream media who can’t spin it down to a 10 word soundbite and who would accuse Corbyn of a lack of clarity if he said the sky was blue. “Well, how blue? Deep blue? Light blue? What about at night? Are you sure you’re fit to be Prime Minister? Why don’t you resign?” ad infinitum.

    #169567

    TimRegency
    Participant

    Yes, the ‘media’ is a handful of billionaires and their errand boys, who are desperate to keep the Tories in power until the cows come home. They control the narrative, the questions and the news so it just helps along their agenda.

    Corbyn says quite often and clearly what he stands for from his Twitter feed. Avoid the media managed nonsense and follow him there.

    #169573

    MP1953
    Participant

    We can all post anecdotal evidence about how all of our friends and family do or don’t vote Labour these days but it will count for nothing to put any conclusive points across.

    The only proof in the pudding will be on an Election Day where people do or don’t put a cross next to the local Labour candidate & the local Lab MPs retain their seat.

    I remember the polling prediction data last election stated that with 99% certainty Atkinson was going to turn the Wrexham seat Tory. Turned out to be bullshit.

    People who are disenfranchised seem to be overly vocal about their lack of support for Labour. Whereas the silent majority usually make up the most votes in town.

    We shall see where we stand

    That’s right Matt with regards to election day and Labour in Wrexham especially, I refer again to my great grandmother who would vote for a Donkey rather than a Tory !

    I just think that the PLP’s views and JC’s do not represent ordinary traditional labour voters throughout the country.

    Therefore I still don’t think that the country as a whole will vote Corbyn in as PM, unless the whole country goes down the DONKEY line… as you say watch this space I guess.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  MP1953.

    The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is.

    #169593

    RDx
    Participant

    They certainly should. The members voted overwhelmingly two times for Corbyn as leader. He then held May to a hung Parliament in the 2017 General Election, in spite of polls and a tidal wave of media hostility.

    If any of these AMs and MPs feel more at home in the Tory or Liberal Democrat parties, they should go and join them.

    To not do so is to block democracy. It’s saying ‘you can have any colour party you like, as long as it’s blue.’

    We don’t vote Labour in order to get Tory.

    Since when was becoming the opposition in a hung parliament an achievement? Especially against a government that had overseen 7 years of unpopular austerity and inequality growth. It’s generally accepted that Theresa May ran one of the worst election campaigns in living memory, throwing away here initial lead in the polls, the polls were also clearly inflated to begin with.

    Not to mention many Labpour MP’s, such as our very own Ian Lucas, campaigning on the lie that they would respect the outcome of the Brexit vote.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  RDx.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  RDx.
    #169596

    RDx
    Participant

    Sorry, bubble. Labour policy on Brexit has been clear since the Party Conference last year when a meeting of 100+ delegates drew up a motion to pass through Conference.
    The only ones who don’t find it clear are the mainstream media who can’t spin it down to a 10 word soundbite and who would accuse Corbyn of a lack of clarity if he said the sky was blue. “Well, how blue? Deep blue? Light blue? What about at night? Are you sure you’re fit to be Prime Minister? Why don’t you resign?” ad infinitum.

    Labour MP’s who are given a platform on live TV consistently fail to communicate a clear unified party vision on Brexit. So can’t really blame the media for this. Seems to me that that they want Brexit in name only, or to push for a 2nd referendum. Which is not what they campaigned on in 2017.

    #169601

    al simm
    Participant

    and of course then there is the added problem with labour that many members in the PLP see brexit as an opportunity to get rid of corbyn.It seems that every other day Watson or Thornberry contradict corbyn over europe.There is no doubt in my mind that Corbyns biggest problem (apart from the media)are his own MP’s,the vast majority of which are tories.It’s a peculiar situation we have here where traditional labour supporters favour corbyn,the labour party rank and file favour corbyn,but the majority of MP’s want him out. I reckon it’s simple,if you are an MP and you prefer a neo-liberal agenda to a socialist one,then join the tories,farage or the libdems and let somebody else take your place.

    #169637

    zinger
    Participant

    I have little interest in politics since it seems to me that we have a few years of Labour who bankrupt the country with popular policies & then a few years of Conservatives trying to re-build the economy by having austere policies that are unpopular. I have little trust in either. It’s a pity that they can’t talk to each other & get the whole thing right. They all go to the same schools.
    The phrase “There is no money left” frightened the hell out of me.

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